3D Art Essentials The Fundamentals of 3D Modeling, Texturing, and Animation Chopine, Ami: Amazon.es: Libros

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20 reviews for 3D Art Essentials The Fundamentals of 3D Modeling, Texturing, and Animation Chopine, Ami: Amazon.es: Libros

  1. Amazonian Consumer

    3D Art Essentials by Ami Chopine is a 260-page introduction to 3D computer modeling, texturing, and animation.It assumes that you do not know anything about this field, and it deals with the terminology and concepts of 3D art, and not specific to any software application. It does list the various packages used today in Chapter 19. It also discuss careers in this field in Chapter 20.The graphics and images in this book are all in black & white (grey scale). The use of color, while not absolutely necessary, tends to make reading and understanding more visually exciting.What make this book more useful and special are the author’s two websites that offer video tutorials, models, reference tables, and links to additional information.They are:[…][…] 3dartessentials.comIndeed, the book teaches you the core concepts and the why’s and how’s, and the two website offer a wealth of information on 3D art that extend and complement what you learned.

  2. Amazonian Consumer

    3D Art Essentials by Ami Chopine is a 260-page introduction to 3D computer modeling, texturing, and animation.It assumes that you do not know anything about this field, and it deals with the terminology and concepts of 3D art, and not specific to any software application. It does list the various packages used today in Chapter 19. It also discuss careers in this field in Chapter 20.The graphics and images in this book are all in black & white (grey scale). The use of color, while not absolutely necessary, tends to make reading and understanding more visually exciting.What make this book more useful and special are the author’s two websites that offer video tutorials, models, reference tables, and links to additional information.They are:[…][…] 3dartessentials.comIndeed, the book teaches you the core concepts and the why’s and how’s, and the two website offer a wealth of information on 3D art that extend and complement what you learned.

  3. Gadget Fan

    This book has grown on me, because it shows how to think about building models and animation on the computer (and provides a pointer to free software). At first I was put off because no specific software was included or even recommended, and because it was in black and white. But as I looked through it, I saw that it is more valuable than a manual for a specific package with pretty pictures, because it has a clear overall point of view about working in 3D animation. It is a great choice for someone who wants to get started in animation, or an artist wanting to know how to do 3D imagery on the computer.It clearly conveys the steps in creating an object with depth and perspective, which is ultimately more powerful and applicable to any software package, than knowing a specific menu command or tool to use in one specific application. It also talks about principles of animation, and gives background history to the field of 3D animation, and just has a good overview of working in the field. Most chapters have tutorials, but as the author empahsizes, you will also need a good manual for the particular software package you are using.My major criticism of the book is that from the description, it is not clear what the book includes. (Most books of this type include a disk of software or examples, or at least a supportive web site.) Also it is not clear what I need or can use in the way of software to work my way through the book. So here it is:– chapter 19 lists a number of packages for 3D modeling and animation, one of which, Blender, is available free; others cost from $69 up to a few thousand dollars. (You can see some of this in the Amazon book preview).– the website associated with the book has three image resources to use with the tutorials: starting robot images, some vehicle model blueprints, and buddhist monk; also the early juggler animation and a list of links to other resources.Also, some of the page numbers in the index are wrong.

  4. Gadget Fan

    This book has grown on me, because it shows how to think about building models and animation on the computer (and provides a pointer to free software). At first I was put off because no specific software was included or even recommended, and because it was in black and white. But as I looked through it, I saw that it is more valuable than a manual for a specific package with pretty pictures, because it has a clear overall point of view about working in 3D animation. It is a great choice for someone who wants to get started in animation, or an artist wanting to know how to do 3D imagery on the computer.It clearly conveys the steps in creating an object with depth and perspective, which is ultimately more powerful and applicable to any software package, than knowing a specific menu command or tool to use in one specific application. It also talks about principles of animation, and gives background history to the field of 3D animation, and just has a good overview of working in the field. Most chapters have tutorials, but as the author empahsizes, you will also need a good manual for the particular software package you are using.My major criticism of the book is that from the description, it is not clear what the book includes. (Most books of this type include a disk of software or examples, or at least a supportive web site.) Also it is not clear what I need or can use in the way of software to work my way through the book. So here it is:– chapter 19 lists a number of packages for 3D modeling and animation, one of which, Blender, is available free; others cost from $69 up to a few thousand dollars. (You can see some of this in the Amazon book preview).– the website associated with the book has three image resources to use with the tutorials: starting robot images, some vehicle model blueprints, and buddhist monk; also the early juggler animation and a list of links to other resources.Also, some of the page numbers in the index are wrong.

  5. Andromeda

    I am just looking into 3D animation. I want to know what the basics look like and how to get started. The book answered many of my initial questions and provided step by step instructions on how the creative process works.I am not sure I can handle it with a book alone as a guide, but it read as an excellent companion to a course taught by a live instructor. I am keeping it as a potential future venture into creative process of animations, but without some live help it was a little overwhelming. I thing it may be an excellent supplement for someone who is already studying animation and has a basic grip on a few moves.

  6. Andromeda

    I am just looking into 3D animation. I want to know what the basics look like and how to get started. The book answered many of my initial questions and provided step by step instructions on how the creative process works.I am not sure I can handle it with a book alone as a guide, but it read as an excellent companion to a course taught by a live instructor. I am keeping it as a potential future venture into creative process of animations, but without some live help it was a little overwhelming. I thing it may be an excellent supplement for someone who is already studying animation and has a basic grip on a few moves.

  7. Tyler Forge

    I really like this book. My level of expertise in creating 3D art is algorithm junkie plus amature SketchUp and Blender guy. I certainly won’t be dumping big money on software. Unless I discover myself wealthy. Until then I’ll mess around for fun.This book is very easy to read and does a great job of taking the reader from zero to productively messing around. What I particularly like is that some very simple but hugely important things are mentioned early and stressed. For example, setting and using a naming convention for your assets as you create them. Also, the book is pointedly agnostic regarding what software to use. In fact, the author is clear that some software is good at some things, other software is good at other things, and software changes all the time. So, the instruction regarding what software to use is to test out your options using trial licenses, pick what works for you, and don’t be afraid to switch.Anyways… The book progresses from getting you messing around with the software and then on through producing a robot with various lighting and animation type things. The concepts are covered in clear language that manages to be truthful without being over simplified.One bit of advice I didn’t really agree with is in regard to what computer to get. The author says to get some pretty hot hardware so that the computer will still be useful in a few years. This is an important concern because the software packages always seem to grow and a 3D artist’s needs will increase as more and more complex projects are attempted. My own preference, however, is to buy hardware that was leading edge about 6 months ago because the prices tend to really drop after those first few months. I can pocket the money saved and, if needed, use it to buy something newer in a few years. Be careful though because this plan only works if you use open source software or can transfer licenses to newer machines.One other thing is that SketchUp style crafting, and SketchUp itself, aren’t even mentioned. This isn’t a big deal if you also use something else like Blender.

  8. Tyler Forge

    I really like this book. My level of expertise in creating 3D art is algorithm junkie plus amature SketchUp and Blender guy. I certainly won’t be dumping big money on software. Unless I discover myself wealthy. Until then I’ll mess around for fun.This book is very easy to read and does a great job of taking the reader from zero to productively messing around. What I particularly like is that some very simple but hugely important things are mentioned early and stressed. For example, setting and using a naming convention for your assets as you create them. Also, the book is pointedly agnostic regarding what software to use. In fact, the author is clear that some software is good at some things, other software is good at other things, and software changes all the time. So, the instruction regarding what software to use is to test out your options using trial licenses, pick what works for you, and don’t be afraid to switch.Anyways… The book progresses from getting you messing around with the software and then on through producing a robot with various lighting and animation type things. The concepts are covered in clear language that manages to be truthful without being over simplified.One bit of advice I didn’t really agree with is in regard to what computer to get. The author says to get some pretty hot hardware so that the computer will still be useful in a few years. This is an important concern because the software packages always seem to grow and a 3D artist’s needs will increase as more and more complex projects are attempted. My own preference, however, is to buy hardware that was leading edge about 6 months ago because the prices tend to really drop after those first few months. I can pocket the money saved and, if needed, use it to buy something newer in a few years. Be careful though because this plan only works if you use open source software or can transfer licenses to newer machines.One other thing is that SketchUp style crafting, and SketchUp itself, aren’t even mentioned. This isn’t a big deal if you also use something else like Blender.

  9. gloria

    I am enjoying every bit of it. Highly recommend it for people starting in the field, without any dependency on the software.

  10. gloria

    I am enjoying every bit of it. Highly recommend it for people starting in the field, without any dependency on the software.

  11. Ed Donovan

    I bought this book to teach myself 3D design concepts and I am using in conjunction with a book on Blender basics. The two work together very well. The book is non-technical and has good exercises but you need a reference for a specific software you will use to do the exercises. It explains concepts very simply and clearly. Still a long way from finishing all the exercises. Looks like it will be fun.

  12. Ed Donovan

    I bought this book to teach myself 3D design concepts and I am using in conjunction with a book on Blender basics. The two work together very well. The book is non-technical and has good exercises but you need a reference for a specific software you will use to do the exercises. It explains concepts very simply and clearly. Still a long way from finishing all the exercises. Looks like it will be fun.

  13. RLC

    As a complete 3D newbie I have found this book to be a great resource. The author’s software agnostic direction is perfect for this type of book. I have found it quite helpful to learn terminology and technique without the constraints of instruction in a particular piece of software. This does slow one down if they are learning the software concurrently, but it also forces, in my case, deeper learning of the software because I am not being led step by step but rather exploring/learning from generalites.This has also been quite helpful in learning general 3D technique and the robot project has been fun. I have been working along with a younger sibling who has had no problems with the concepts as explained (well mostly!).I am greatful to the author for producing the book in this manner as I have been able to learn about the subject as well as some software rather than just the later. I would think many above the novice level would not find the book helpful, but it shure has done wonders for me!

  14. RLC

    As a complete 3D newbie I have found this book to be a great resource. The author’s software agnostic direction is perfect for this type of book. I have found it quite helpful to learn terminology and technique without the constraints of instruction in a particular piece of software. This does slow one down if they are learning the software concurrently, but it also forces, in my case, deeper learning of the software because I am not being led step by step but rather exploring/learning from generalites.This has also been quite helpful in learning general 3D technique and the robot project has been fun. I have been working along with a younger sibling who has had no problems with the concepts as explained (well mostly!).I am greatful to the author for producing the book in this manner as I have been able to learn about the subject as well as some software rather than just the later. I would think many above the novice level would not find the book helpful, but it shure has done wonders for me!

  15. Nick A.

    I have some previous experience with 3d modelling; although nothing major. This book does what it says, teaching you the essentials of modelling, texturing and animation, so i highly recommend it for beginners. Some are discouraged with the lack of program specific support/tutorials but it is for the best in my opinion to first just a lay foundation for the concepts.For a beginner once you get the basic concepts and cad jargon down through this book, then you should start to pick a modelling program and start working on it with some tutorials you find on the net. I dont mean read the whole book in one go, but just the first 2-3 chapters on actual modeling (as the first 2 chaps are history/other stuff in this book) or so to get started.The concepts and jargon you learn will no doubt help you understand the interface of the programs you will use in the near future (because there is no doubt if you just open up a cad program with minimal knowledge beforehand you WILL be overwhelmed by the vast array of options).BUt if you knew what some of those buttons meant you can formulate and come up with something for their use… With the knowledge you get from this book, the tutorials you work on will make so much more sense as well since you will have a much clear idea of what is going on.Basically this book will be your building block and lay the bricks for your future development in 3d art. Thats what it is for and it does that admirably in my opinion. Remember also that reading books will only get you so far, actually doing it is much more valuable to your development so dont spend too much time on trying to learn everything right away by speeding through the book.

  16. kstars

    I am going to be getting a 3D-capable computer – finally. I have Photoshop 3D also. I want to make landscapes with Bryce and play with Daz Studio. This book is EXACTLY what I need right now to form the building blocks of 3D modeling.Nothing fancy, just the basic concepts of 3D modeling. I say that because there is no Math involved – yay!Geekatplay.com is where the author, Ami Chopine, has been seen. There are tutorials and other creative nuggets of info there. So this book is an outgrowth of that site.I feel so lucky to have this book for reference, as I know only what I learned from Swift 3D, a Flash-based program.I would discourage experienced modelers from buying this book, as this is just a fundamentals book. There is History and theory in this book that can be applied to most any 3D program. Yes, that is great news! There is a list of programs in this book that this book can be applied with. Not an exhaustive list, but mine were covered.Also, as there are a series of tutorials in this book, you can literally start a project from the beginning. This covers in pictorials what a manual can’t. The visual cues alone make this book worth it.

  17. Nick A.

    I have some previous experience with 3d modelling; although nothing major. This book does what it says, teaching you the essentials of modelling, texturing and animation, so i highly recommend it for beginners. Some are discouraged with the lack of program specific support/tutorials but it is for the best in my opinion to first just a lay foundation for the concepts.For a beginner once you get the basic concepts and cad jargon down through this book, then you should start to pick a modelling program and start working on it with some tutorials you find on the net. I dont mean read the whole book in one go, but just the first 2-3 chapters on actual modeling (as the first 2 chaps are history/other stuff in this book) or so to get started.The concepts and jargon you learn will no doubt help you understand the interface of the programs you will use in the near future (because there is no doubt if you just open up a cad program with minimal knowledge beforehand you WILL be overwhelmed by the vast array of options).BUt if you knew what some of those buttons meant you can formulate and come up with something for their use… With the knowledge you get from this book, the tutorials you work on will make so much more sense as well since you will have a much clear idea of what is going on.Basically this book will be your building block and lay the bricks for your future development in 3d art. Thats what it is for and it does that admirably in my opinion. Remember also that reading books will only get you so far, actually doing it is much more valuable to your development so dont spend too much time on trying to learn everything right away by speeding through the book.

  18. kstars

    I am going to be getting a 3D-capable computer – finally. I have Photoshop 3D also. I want to make landscapes with Bryce and play with Daz Studio. This book is EXACTLY what I need right now to form the building blocks of 3D modeling.Nothing fancy, just the basic concepts of 3D modeling. I say that because there is no Math involved – yay!Geekatplay.com is where the author, Ami Chopine, has been seen. There are tutorials and other creative nuggets of info there. So this book is an outgrowth of that site.I feel so lucky to have this book for reference, as I know only what I learned from Swift 3D, a Flash-based program.I would discourage experienced modelers from buying this book, as this is just a fundamentals book. There is History and theory in this book that can be applied to most any 3D program. Yes, that is great news! There is a list of programs in this book that this book can be applied with. Not an exhaustive list, but mine were covered.Also, as there are a series of tutorials in this book, you can literally start a project from the beginning. This covers in pictorials what a manual can’t. The visual cues alone make this book worth it.

  19. Patrick Regan

    A book on creating 3D art that does not focus on any one software tool may seem somewhat useless. After all, whether you use Maya or 3D Studio Max or Blender, you can easily find a book explaining the details of using your particular 3D Animation software. There is a problem with this approach though. The keyword is the word “details”. Any book that purports to explain how to use a software tool is going to have little space left to explain the underlying aspects of 3D art creation that the software is designed to enable you to make. I have spent some time trying to learn how to use the Blender software and I have found this book to be very valuable. For example, in this book you can learn the difference between NURBS and Subdivision Surfaces, the difference between bump mapping and displacement mapping and many other things. Also, in addition to explaining the technologies underlying 3D image creation, the author of this book provides information as to the pros and cons of each technology. Finally, via tutorials at the end of each chapter, the author provides software agnostic hints on how to proceed to make use of the plethora of different technologies and techniques that underly today’s 3D animation software. I really liked this book. If you are finding yourself at sea with your favorite 3D software and its accompanying tutorials I recommend that you pick up this book, it will leave you with a foundation in 3D image and animation creation that you can build on.

  20. Patrick Regan

    A book on creating 3D art that does not focus on any one software tool may seem somewhat useless. After all, whether you use Maya or 3D Studio Max or Blender, you can easily find a book explaining the details of using your particular 3D Animation software. There is a problem with this approach though. The keyword is the word “details”. Any book that purports to explain how to use a software tool is going to have little space left to explain the underlying aspects of 3D art creation that the software is designed to enable you to make. I have spent some time trying to learn how to use the Blender software and I have found this book to be very valuable. For example, in this book you can learn the difference between NURBS and Subdivision Surfaces, the difference between bump mapping and displacement mapping and many other things. Also, in addition to explaining the technologies underlying 3D image creation, the author of this book provides information as to the pros and cons of each technology. Finally, via tutorials at the end of each chapter, the author provides software agnostic hints on how to proceed to make use of the plethora of different technologies and techniques that underly today’s 3D animation software. I really liked this book. If you are finding yourself at sea with your favorite 3D software and its accompanying tutorials I recommend that you pick up this book, it will leave you with a foundation in 3D image and animation creation that you can build on.

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